TagWordPress

2016 – My Year in Review

Before looking too far ahead to the future, it’s important to spend time to reflect over the past year’s events, identify successes and failures, and devise ways to improve. Describing my 2016 is a challenge for me to find the right words for. This post continues a habit I started last year with my 2015 Year in Review. One thing I discover nearly every day is that I’m always learning new things from various people and circumstances. Even though 2017 is already getting started, I want to reflect back on some of these experiences and opportunities of the past year.

Continue reading

GSoC 2016: Moving towards staging

This week wraps up for July and the last period of Google Summer of Code (GSoC 2016) is almost here. As the summer comes to a close, I’m working on the last steps for preparing my project for deployment into Fedora’s Ansible infrastructure. Once it checks out in a staging instance, it can make the move to production.

Continue reading

GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Documentation and upgrades

This week and the last were busy, but I’ve made some more progress towards creating the last, idempotent product for managing WordPress installations in Fedora’s Infrastructure for GSoC 2016. The past two weeks had me mostly working on writing the standard operating procedure / documentation for my final product as well as diving more into handling upgrades with WordPress. My primary playbook for installing WordPress is mostly complete, pending one last annoyance.

Continue reading

GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Breaking down WordPress networks

This week, with an initial playbook for creating a WordPress installation created (albeit needing polish), my next focus was to look at the idea of creating a WordPress multi-site network. Creating a multi-site network would offer the benefits of only having to keep up a single base installation, with new sites extending from the same core of WordPress. Before making further refinements to the playbook, I wanted to investigate whether a WordPress network would be the best fit for Fedora.

Continue reading

WordPress Cron, CloudFlare, and SSL

Edit: I haven’t tried this in a while, but this is one of my most popular blog posts. If you try this and it works, please consider leaving a comment and let me know if anything can be improved. Thanks!


Thanks to the power of LetsEncrypt, I recently moved most of my sites over to using HTTPS, or in other words, SSL. I also use CloudFlare for managing most of my sites as well. What I wasn’t fully aware of was that CloudFlare also limits scripts to increase performance (among other things). This broke WordPress cron, without my knowledge! How does one fix this issue?

WordPress cron, CloudFlare, and SSL are not always friends

CloudFlare is a service that aims to make websites faster and more secure.

Continue reading