TagOpen Source

2016 – My Year in Review

Before looking too far ahead to the future, it’s important to spend time to reflect over the past year’s events, identify successes and failures, and devise ways to improve. Describing my 2016 is a challenge for me to find the right words for. This post continues a habit I started last year with my 2015 Year in Review. One thing I discover nearly every day is that I’m always learning new things from various people and circumstances. Even though 2017 is already getting started, I want to reflect back on some of these experiences and opportunities of the past year.

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Students and professors work across the aisle during Election Night Hackathon

This post was originally published on Opensource.com.


On Tuesday, November 8th, 2016, the [email protected] at the MAGIC Center at RIT held the annual Election Night Hackathon. Over 140 students from across campus and across departments gathered together to work on a range of civic projects as the election night results came in. This year’s hackathon was the sixth in a long-standing tradition of civic duty and open source collaboration.

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How to set up GitHub organizations for clubs

For many universities and colleges, there are many technical clubs that students can join. Some clubs focus on programming or using programming for collaborative projects. For anything involving code, clubs usually turn to GitHub. GitHub has become the standard for open source project hosting by thousands of projects in the world. GitHub organizations are the tool GitHub provides to allow someone to create a team of people for working on projects. Organizations can have many repositories and smaller teams inside of them. When getting started with GitHub, there is a method to the madness, and there are ways you can have an ordered organization instead of keeping it messy. Here’s how you do it.

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How Minecraft got me involved in the open source community

This post was originally published on OpenSource.com.


When people first think of “open source”, their mind probably first goes to code. Something technical that requires an intermediate understanding of computers or programming languages. But open source is a broad concept that goes beyond only binary bits and bytes. Open source projects hold great regard for community participation. The community is a fundamental piece of a successful open source project. For my experience getting involved with open source, I began in the community and worked my way around from there. At the age of fifteen, I was beginning my open source journey and I didn’t even know it.

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Virtual meetup with WiC, Open Labs, FOSS Wave

Over the past year, I’ve met incredible people from around the world doing great things in their local communities. At my university, the Women in Computing @ RIT program provides networking for students with faculty, staff, and alumni. They also help advance women in computing through community outreach. I’ve also come into contact with two other international tech communities with interesting stories of their own. With the help of the WiC events committee, we are working on organizing a virtual meetup with WiC from New York, Open Labs Albania, and FOSS Wave from India to introduce each other, share experiences, and more.

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GSoC 2016: That’s a wrap!

Tomorrow, August 22, 2016, marks the end of the Google Summer of Code 2016 program. This year, I participated as a student for the Fedora Project working on my proposal, “Ansible and the Community (or automation improving innovation)“. You can read my original project proposal on the Fedora wiki. Over the summer, I spent time learning more about Ansible, applying the knowledge to real-world applications, and then taking that experience and writing my final deliverable. The last deliverable items, closing plans, and thoughts on the journey are detailed as follows.

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Cześć, Poland! Back to Europe

Earlier this month, I received some of the most exciting news I have had all year. After much finger-crossing and (hopefully) hard work, I am traveling to Kraków, Poland, for the Fedora Project‘s annual Flock conference. Flock is described by the organizers as the following.

Flock, now in its fourth year, is a conference for Fedora contributors to come together, discuss new ideas, work to make those ideas a reality, and continue to promote the core values of the Fedora community: Freedom, Friends, Features, and First.

This year, I am attending as a contributor to the project, giving a talk, and leading a workshop!

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GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Breaking down WordPress networks

This week, with an initial playbook for creating a WordPress installation created (albeit needing polish), my next focus was to look at the idea of creating a WordPress multi-site network. Creating a multi-site network would offer the benefits of only having to keep up a single base installation, with new sites extending from the same core of WordPress. Before making further refinements to the playbook, I wanted to investigate whether a WordPress network would be the best fit for Fedora.

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Fedora Ambassadors: Communicating about Design

This week is busy and continues to keep the pace of previous weeks. A lot has happened this week in the Fedora Project and I’ve taken on a few new tasks too. In addition to existing work on Google Summer of Code, Community Operations, Marketing, and more, I wanted to take some time this week to focus on CommOps Ticket #71. This ticket originally focused on improving accessibility of design resources for Fedora Ambassadors. However, after an interesting conversation with Máirín Duffy on the Design Team workflow, I discovered the availability was not the main issue. Instead, it seemed like communicating was an area needing focus.

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Setting up Vagrant for testing Ansible

As part of my Google Summer of Code project proposal for the Fedora Project, I’ve spent a lot of time learning about the ins and outs of Ansible. Ansible is a handy task and configuration automation utility. In the Fedora Project, Ansible is used extensively in Fedora’s infrastructure. But if you’re first starting to learn Ansible, it might be tricky to test and play with it if you don’t have production or development servers you can use. This is where Vagrant comes in.

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