TagHumanitarian Free and Open Source Software (HFOSS)

This tag is used for any posts that are syndicated to the ofCourse blog listing for the Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development course at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

BrickHack 2016

Last month at the Rochester Institute of Technology, BrickHack 2016 came to a close. BrickHack is an annual hackathon organized by students at RIT. Close to 300 people attend every year. This year was BrickHack’s second event.

BrickHack 2016 and Fedora

This year, I attended with the Fedora Project team, which included people like Remy DeCausemaker, Mike DePaulo, Charles Profitt, Ralph Bean, and Ryan Scott Brown. In addition to the Fedora crew, many of my friends and fellow students were there, like Mike Nolan and Brendan Whitfield. There were countless others that made the weekend awesome and incredible.

For pictures and more details, read my full report on the Fedora Community Blog.

BrickHack 2016 and Fedora: Event Report

HFOSS: Quiz #2

In the Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development (HFOSS) course at the Rochester Institute of Technology, quizzes are in the form of blog posts submitted during the class period. The room stays quiet, but it is an open IRC quiz, so many of the students collaborated with each other in #rit-foss on freenode for the quiz.

This post is my quiz submission for the Spring 2016 semester Quiz #2.

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HFOSS: Final Project Proposal

What is this?

This post serves as the project proposal for me and my team’s Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software DevelopmentFinal Project“.

In this project proposal, we take a look at the game idea we are looking at completing for this project, based on the New York 4th grade math curriculum. Our game idea is based off of a minigame from Logical Journey of the Zoombinis, a puzzle-solving educational game.

HFOSS Final Project: Zoombinis Pizza Pass minigame

Screenshot from 1996’s “Logical Journey of the Zoombinis” Pizza Pass level.

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HFOSS: Community Architecture Team Project Report

For the Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development (HFOSS) course at the Rochester Institute of Technology, we were tasked with the Community Architecture (CommArch) project. For this project, we were tasked with analyzing an open source project’s community and the general details surrounding the project. This blog post serves as the analysis our team prepared for the project.

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Why I love WiCHacks

Two weekends ago, from February 27th to the 28th, the Women in Computing program at the Rochester Institute of Technology hosted their third annual WiCHacks hackathon. WiCHacks is a women-only hackathon open to university students and high school juniors and seniors. WiCHacks is a collaborative event bringing women together from across RIT, the country, and even the world (including attendees from Germany). The participants are in a supportive and empowering environment to build something awesome and present it to everyone else in the span of one weekend.

So why am I writing about WiCHacks? I signed up as a volunteer for the event this year. I would help with the setup, running the event, and packing it up. During my experience as a volunteer, I met some other awesome people, saw some really cool projects, and discovered an inviting and inclusive community on campus.

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HFOSS: Quiz #1

In the Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development (HFOSS) course at the Rochester Institute of Technology, quizzes are in the form of blog posts submitted during the class period. The room stays quiet, but it is an open IRC quiz, so many of the students collaborated with each other in #rit-foss on freenode for the quiz.

This post is my quiz submission for the Spring 2016 semester Quiz #1.

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HFOSS: Community Architecture (CommArch) Project Proposal

What is this?

This post serves as the project proposal for me and my team’s Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software DevelopmentCommunity Architecture” project (shortened to CommArch)!

In this project proposal, we take a preliminary look at the project we’re looking at analyzing, Tahrir, and the different criteria we are assigned to look at.

Fedora is a free and open-source Linux distribution.

Fedora is a free and open-source Linux distribution.

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HFOSS: Smoke test an XO laptop

XO laptop used by the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program

The XO laptop deployed by the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program

For the next homework assignment in my Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development (HFOSS) course, we were tasked with running a smoke test of the XO laptops we are assigned for class. Some of the laptops are notoriously more broken than others. Seeing as how some of these date to around ten years ago, it’s easy to understand how they have been become more defunct over the years.

Part of my assignment was to run some basic tests and practices on my XO laptop to make sure it would be capable for most core functionalities. This article will serve as my step-by-step smoke test report on my XO laptop, which I have affectionately named Hedron.

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HFOSS: Double bugfix

This article is a further addition to the series of blog posts for my Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development course at RIT. For this week’s homework, we are tasked with finding an open source project, looking at known bugs or finding new ones, and submitting a bugfix. I focused on two projects to begin with: møte and FOSSProfiles.

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The most important part of your project might not even be a line of code

Open-source licensing: how does it affect your work?

Open-source licensing: how does it affect your work?

Today’s entry to the blog is sourced from a thread that I posted on the SpigotMC Forums. If you wish to join in the discussion about this, feel free to chime in on the thread or leave a comment on my blog. In this post, I covered licensing, licenses, and why your open-source software project should have a license. You can read my original post in this blog entry.

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