Tagcontainers

ListenBrainz community gardening and user statistics

This post is part of a series of posts where I contribute to the ListenBrainz project for my independent study at the Rochester Institute of Technology in the fall 2017 semester. For more posts, find them in this tag.


My progress with ListenBrainz slowed, but I am resuming the pace of contributing and advancing on my independent study timeline. This past week, I finished out assigned tasks to discuss contributor-related documentation, like a Code of Conduct, contributor guidelines, and a pull request template. I began research on user statistics and found some already created. I wrote one of my own, but need to learn more about Google BigQuery to advance further.

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Exploring Google Code-In, ListenBrainz easyfix bugs, D3.js

This post is part of a series of posts where I contribute to the ListenBrainz project for my independent study at the Rochester Institute of Technology in the fall 2017 semester. For more posts, find them in this tag.


Last week moved quickly for me in ListenBrainz. I submitted multiple pull requests and participated in the weekly developer’s meeting on Monday. I was also invited to take part as a mentor for ListenBrainz for the upcoming round of Google Code-In! In addition to my changes and new role as a mentor, I’m researching libraries like D3.js to help build visualizations for music data.  Suddenly, everything started moving fast!

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How to set up a ListenBrainz development environment

This post is part of a series of posts where I contribute to the ListenBrainz project for my independent study at the Rochester Institute of Technology in the fall 2017 semester. For more posts, find them in this tag.


One of the first rites of passage when working on a new project is creating your development environment. It always seems simple, but sometimes there are bumps along the way. The first activity I did to begin contributing to ListenBrainz was create my development environment. I wasn’t successful with the documentation in the README, so I had to play around and work with the project before I was even running it.

The first part of this post details how to set up your own development environment. Then, the second half talks about the solution I came up with and my first contribution back to the project.

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Sign at the line: Deploying an app to CoreOS Tectonic

This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. The second post showed how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer. The last post and this post build on top of the Fedora Magazine series. The third post introduced how to deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS). This fourth post teaches how to deploy a simple web application to your Tectonic installation.


Welcome back to the Kubernetes and Fedora series. Each week, we build on the previous articles in the series to help introduce you to using Kubernetes. This article picks up from where we left off last when you installed Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS). By the end of this article, you will…

  • Start up Redis master and slave pods
  • Start a front-end pod that interacts with the Redis pods
  • Deploy a simple web app for all of your friends to leave you messages

Compared to previous articles, this article will be a little more hands-on. Also like before, this is based off an excellent tutorial in the upstream Kubernetes documentation. Let’s get started!

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Deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS)

This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. The second post showed how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer. This post builds on top of the Fedora Magazine series by showing how to deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS).


Welcome back to the Kubernetes and Fedora series. Each week, we build on the previous articles in the series to help introduce you to using Kubernetes. This article takes off from running Kubernetes on your own hardware and moves us one step closer to the cloud. By the end of this article, you will…

  • Understand what CoreOS Tectonic is
  • Set up Amazon Web Services (AWS) for Tectonic
  • Deploy Tectonic to AWS

This article is also based off of the excellent tutorial provided in the CoreOS documentation. Let’s get started!

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Clustered computing on Fedora with Minikube

This article was originally published on the Fedora Magazine.


This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. This second post shows you how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer.


Once you have a better understanding of what the key concepts and terminology in Kubernetes are, getting started is easier. Like many programming tutorials, this tutorial shows you how to build a “Hello World” application and deploy it locally on your computer using Kubernetes. This is a simple tutorial because there aren’t multiple nodes to work with. Instead, the only device we’re using is a single node (a.k.a. your computer). By the end, you’ll see how to deploy a Node.js application into a Kubernetes pod and manage it with a deployment on Fedora.

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Introduction to Kubernetes with Fedora

This article was originally published on the Fedora Magazine.


This article is part of a short series that introduces Kubernetes. This beginner-oriented series covers some higher level concepts and gives examples of using Kubernetes on Fedora.


The information technology world changes daily, and the demands of building scalable infrastructure become more important. Containers aren’t anything new these days, and have various uses and implementations. But what about building scalable, containerized applications? By itself, Docker and other tools don’t quite cut it, as far as building the infrastructure to support containers. How do you deploy, scale, and manage containerized applications in your infrastructure? This is where tools such as Kubernetes comes in. Kubernetes is an open source system that automates deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Kubernetes was originally developed by Google before being donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, a project of the Linux Foundation. This article gives a quick precursor to what Kubernetes is and what some of the buzzwords really mean.

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