TagAnsible

How to fix missing Python for Ansible in Fedora Vagrant

Recently, I started to use Vagrant to test Ansible playbooks on Fedora machines. I’m using the Fedora 28 cloud base image. However, when I tried to provision my Vagrant box, I was warned the Python binary is missing.

$ vagrant provision
==> default: Running provisioner: ansible...
    default: Running ansible-playbook...

PLAY [all] *********************************************************************

TASK [Gathering Facts] *********************************************************
fatal: [default]: FAILED! => {"changed": false, "module_stderr": "Shared connection to 192.168.121.3 closed.\r\n", "module_stdout": "\r\n/bin/sh: /usr/bin/python: No such file or directory\r\n", "msg": "MODULE FAILURE", "rc": 127}
	to retry, use: --limit @playbook.retry
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2016 – My Year in Review

Before looking too far ahead to the future, it’s important to spend time to reflect over the past year’s events, identify successes and failures, and devise ways to improve. Describing my 2016 is a challenge for me to find the right words for. This post continues a habit I started last year with my 2015 Year in Review. One thing I discover nearly every day is that I’m always learning new things from various people and circumstances. Even though 2017 is already getting started, I want to reflect back on some of these experiences and opportunities of the past year.

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GSoC 2016: That’s a wrap!

Tomorrow, August 22, 2016, marks the end of the Google Summer of Code 2016 program. This year, I participated as a student for the Fedora Project working on my proposal, “Ansible and the Community (or automation improving innovation)“. You can read my original project proposal on the Fedora wiki. Over the summer, I spent time learning more about Ansible, applying the knowledge to real-world applications, and then taking that experience and writing my final deliverable. The last deliverable items, closing plans, and thoughts on the journey are detailed as follows.

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GSoC 2016: Moving towards staging

This week wraps up for July and the last period of Google Summer of Code (GSoC 2016) is almost here. As the summer comes to a close, I’m working on the last steps for preparing my project for deployment into Fedora’s Ansible infrastructure. Once it checks out in a staging instance, it can make the move to production.

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GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Documentation and upgrades

This week and the last were busy, but I’ve made some more progress towards creating the last, idempotent product for managing WordPress installations in Fedora’s Infrastructure for GSoC 2016. The past two weeks had me mostly working on writing the standard operating procedure / documentation for my final product as well as diving more into handling upgrades with WordPress. My primary playbook for installing WordPress is mostly complete, pending one last annoyance.

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How to push Fedora Badges

Ever wondered what goes on behind the magic of Fedora Badges? How does a badge go from being a design to an earn-able entity? This short but handy guide breaks down the entire process for you. This post is adapted from a series of notes I took while watching Ralph Bean demo the procedure at PyCon. This guide is a supplement, not a replacement, for the official Badges SOP.

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GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Assembling the orchestra

This week is the Google Summer of Code 2016 midterm evaluation week. Over the past month since the program started, I’ve learned more about the technology I’m working with, implementing it within my infrastructure, and moving closer to completing my proposal. My original project proposal details how I am working with Ansible to bring improved automation for WordPress platforms within Fedora, particularly to the Fedora Community Blog and the Fedora Magazine.

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Setting up Vagrant for testing Ansible

As part of my Google Summer of Code project proposal for the Fedora Project, I’ve spent a lot of time learning about the ins and outs of Ansible. Ansible is a handy task and configuration automation utility. In the Fedora Project, Ansible is used extensively in Fedora’s infrastructure. But if you’re first starting to learn Ansible, it might be tricky to test and play with it if you don’t have production or development servers you can use. This is where Vagrant comes in.

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