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IRC for the 21st century: introducing Riot

This article was originally published on Opensource.com.


Internet Relay Chat, or IRC, is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC’s best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There’s also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC. But on the reverse side, usability is a concern. Most common user interfaces for IRC clients or platforms aren’t always intuitive. People from parts of the world with unstable Internet connections are challenged with remaining connected to participate in conversation. Many people have tried addressing this problem before, but none have come as far as Riot.

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Sign at the line: Deploying an app to CoreOS Tectonic

This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. The second post showed how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer. The last post and this post build on top of the Fedora Magazine series. The third post introduced how to deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS). This fourth post teaches how to deploy a simple web application to your Tectonic installation.


Welcome back to the Kubernetes and Fedora series. Each week, we build on the previous articles in the series to help introduce you to using Kubernetes. This article picks up from where we left off last when you installed Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS). By the end of this article, you will…

  • Start up Redis master and slave pods
  • Start a front-end pod that interacts with the Redis pods
  • Deploy a simple web app for all of your friends to leave you messages

Compared to previous articles, this article will be a little more hands-on. Also like before, this is based off an excellent tutorial in the upstream Kubernetes documentation. Let’s get started!

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FAmSCo August 2017 elections: Thoughts on a global community

A new release of Fedora makes headlines this month. With every release, it also means a new round of the Fedora community leadership elections. On 24 July 2017, the call for nominations went out for candidates. The Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo), Fedora Ambassador Steering Committee (FAmSCo), and the Fedora Council all have seats open. Already, discussions on nominations are happening. The candidate interview templates are being prepared. Even now, the nomination lists are filling up. However, I want to share an opinion on the upcoming FAmSCo election specifically.

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Deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS)

This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. The second post showed how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer. This post builds on top of the Fedora Magazine series by showing how to deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS).


Welcome back to the Kubernetes and Fedora series. Each week, we build on the previous articles in the series to help introduce you to using Kubernetes. This article takes off from running Kubernetes on your own hardware and moves us one step closer to the cloud. By the end of this article, you will…

  • Understand what CoreOS Tectonic is
  • Set up Amazon Web Services (AWS) for Tectonic
  • Deploy Tectonic to AWS

This article is also based off of the excellent tutorial provided in the CoreOS documentation. Let’s get started!

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Ura Design crowdfunds free design for open source projects

This article was originally published on Opensource.com.


Ura Design logoOpen source software is nothing new in 2017. Even now, big tech giants are exploring open source. More and more companies allow employees to contribute to open source software on company hours, if it isn’t altogether encouraged. However, design assets and work have not enjoyed the same popularity with open source licensing and use as software has. However, Albanian design agency Ura Design is helping change this.

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Clustered computing on Fedora with Minikube

This article was originally published on the Fedora Magazine.


This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. This second post shows you how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer.


Once you have a better understanding of what the key concepts and terminology in Kubernetes are, getting started is easier. Like many programming tutorials, this tutorial shows you how to build a “Hello World” application and deploy it locally on your computer using Kubernetes. This is a simple tutorial because there aren’t multiple nodes to work with. Instead, the only device we’re using is a single node (a.k.a. your computer). By the end, you’ll see how to deploy a Node.js application into a Kubernetes pod and manage it with a deployment on Fedora.

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Introduction to Kubernetes with Fedora

This article was originally published on the Fedora Magazine.


This article is part of a short series that introduces Kubernetes. This beginner-oriented series covers some higher level concepts and gives examples of using Kubernetes on Fedora.


The information technology world changes daily, and the demands of building scalable infrastructure become more important. Containers aren’t anything new these days, and have various uses and implementations. But what about building scalable, containerized applications? By itself, Docker and other tools don’t quite cut it, as far as building the infrastructure to support containers. How do you deploy, scale, and manage containerized applications in your infrastructure? This is where tools such as Kubernetes comes in. Kubernetes is an open source system that automates deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Kubernetes was originally developed by Google before being donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, a project of the Linux Foundation. This article gives a quick precursor to what Kubernetes is and what some of the buzzwords really mean.

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What I discovered in Tirana, Albania

The past few months have brought many changes for me. I traveled throughout Europe to experience some of the open source conferences and communities across the continent. Along the way, I met incredible people with powerful stories about their own communities. However, there is one community that I knew about before I came to Europe. The Open Labs Hackerspace in Tirana, Albania is a special community that I was fortunate enough to discover and meet. Together, they have helped set in motion the open source way in their own city.

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What is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome?

May is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Awareness Month. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, abbreviated to EDS, is a genetic disorder that affects 1 out of 5,000 people across the world. It’s also considered an “invisible illness” since it isn’t clear from the outside whether someone is living with EDS.

This article explains what Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is, its symptoms, how to support someone living with EDS, and simple actions anyone can take to help.

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Mission to understand: Fedora Diversity FAD 2017

This article was originally published on the Fedora Community Blog.


Team picture of the Diversity Team members (left to right: Brian Exelbierd, Amita Sharma, Radka Janek, Jona Azizaj, Bhagyashree Padalkar, Justin W. Flory)

Team picture of the Diversity Team members (left to right: Brian Exelbierd, Amita Sharma, Radka Janek, Jona Azizaj, Bhagyashree Padalkar, Justin W. Flory)

The Fedora Diversity FAD (a.k.a. Fedora Activity Day, or a sprint) took place during the weekend of DevConf, 27-29 January. The original planning for this FAD started in August 2016, after the Flock 2016 conference. At Flock, the Diversity Team held a panel with open discussion about diversity and inclusion efforts in Fedora. Based on the feedback received during and after the panel, it was a priority for us to continue working on the objectives we had established before Flock. For the FAD, a majority of the Fedora Diversity Team was present along with a few others.

We made significant progress in accomplishing our larger objectives and to contribute to the Fedora Project mission and goals. The primary objectives we established for our FAD were completing plans for the demographic survey, building a campaign based on those results, and analyzing our Code of Conduct to find ways to better impact the community. This report covers each of these objectives, what we accomplished, and what we plan to do next.

Logic model used for preliminary planning and mapping out the activities and impact of the Fedora Diversity FAD 2017

Logic model used for preliminary planning and mapping out the activities and impact of the Fedora Diversity FAD

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