CategoryTechnology

Technology

Articles in this category are generally related to technology and technological innovation in a broad sense.

Introducing InfluxDB: Time-series database stack

Article originally published on Opensource.com.


The needs and demands of infrastructure environments changes every year. With time, systems become more complex and involved. But when infrastructure grows and becomes more complex, it’s meaningless if we don’t understand it and what’s happening in our environment. This is why monitoring tools and software are often used in these environments, so operators and administrators see problems and fix them in real-time. But what if we want to predict problems before they happen? Collecting metrics and data about our environment give us a window into how our infrastructure is performing and lets us make predictions based on data. When we know and understand what’s happening, we can prevent problems before they happen.

But how do we collect and store this data? For example, if we want to collect data on the CPU usage of 100 machines every ten seconds, we’re generating a lot of data. On top of that, what if each machine is running fifteen containers? What if you want to generate data about each of those individual containers too? What about by the process? This is where time-series data becomes helpful. Time-series databases store time-series data. But what does that mean? We’ll explain all of this and more and introduce you to InfluxDB, an open source time-series database. By the end of this article, you will understand…

  • What time-series data / databases are
  • Quick introduction to InfluxDB and the TICK stack
  • How to install InfluxDB and other tools

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IRC for the 21st century: introducing Riot

This article was originally published on Opensource.com.


Internet Relay Chat, or IRC, is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC’s best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There’s also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC. But on the reverse side, usability is a concern. Most common user interfaces for IRC clients or platforms aren’t always intuitive. People from parts of the world with unstable Internet connections are challenged with remaining connected to participate in conversation. Many people have tried addressing this problem before, but none have come as far as Riot.

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Sign at the line: Deploying an app to CoreOS Tectonic

This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. The second post showed how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer. The last post and this post build on top of the Fedora Magazine series. The third post introduced how to deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS). This fourth post teaches how to deploy a simple web application to your Tectonic installation.


Welcome back to the Kubernetes and Fedora series. Each week, we build on the previous articles in the series to help introduce you to using Kubernetes. This article picks up from where we left off last when you installed Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS). By the end of this article, you will…

  • Start up Redis master and slave pods
  • Start a front-end pod that interacts with the Redis pods
  • Deploy a simple web app for all of your friends to leave you messages

Compared to previous articles, this article will be a little more hands-on. Also like before, this is based off an excellent tutorial in the upstream Kubernetes documentation. Let’s get started!

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Deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS)

This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. The second post showed how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer. This post builds on top of the Fedora Magazine series by showing how to deploy CoreOS Tectonic to Amazon Web Services (AWS).


Welcome back to the Kubernetes and Fedora series. Each week, we build on the previous articles in the series to help introduce you to using Kubernetes. This article takes off from running Kubernetes on your own hardware and moves us one step closer to the cloud. By the end of this article, you will…

  • Understand what CoreOS Tectonic is
  • Set up Amazon Web Services (AWS) for Tectonic
  • Deploy Tectonic to AWS

This article is also based off of the excellent tutorial provided in the CoreOS documentation. Let’s get started!

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Clustered computing on Fedora with Minikube

This article was originally published on the Fedora Magazine.


This is a short series to introduce Kubernetes, what it does, and how to experiment with it on Fedora. This is a beginner-oriented series to help introduce some higher level concepts and give examples of using it on Fedora. In the first post, we covered key concepts in Kubernetes. This second post shows you how to build a single-node Kubernetes deployment on your own computer.


Once you have a better understanding of what the key concepts and terminology in Kubernetes are, getting started is easier. Like many programming tutorials, this tutorial shows you how to build a “Hello World” application and deploy it locally on your computer using Kubernetes. This is a simple tutorial because there aren’t multiple nodes to work with. Instead, the only device we’re using is a single node (a.k.a. your computer). By the end, you’ll see how to deploy a Node.js application into a Kubernetes pod and manage it with a deployment on Fedora.

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Introduction to Kubernetes with Fedora

This article was originally published on the Fedora Magazine.


This article is part of a short series that introduces Kubernetes. This beginner-oriented series covers some higher level concepts and gives examples of using Kubernetes on Fedora.


The information technology world changes daily, and the demands of building scalable infrastructure become more important. Containers aren’t anything new these days, and have various uses and implementations. But what about building scalable, containerized applications? By itself, Docker and other tools don’t quite cut it, as far as building the infrastructure to support containers. How do you deploy, scale, and manage containerized applications in your infrastructure? This is where tools such as Kubernetes comes in. Kubernetes is an open source system that automates deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Kubernetes was originally developed by Google before being donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, a project of the Linux Foundation. This article gives a quick precursor to what Kubernetes is and what some of the buzzwords really mean.

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Students meet Fedora at Linux Weekend 2017

This article was originally published on the Fedora Magazine.


Open source projects are built online and a lot of their community members are placed all over the world. Even though projects have people from around the world, this doesn’t stop ambitious community members to organize open source conferences or events in their own cities. Whether they’re focused generally to open source or for a specific project, you can find a variety of conferences, hackathons, workshops, or meet-ups all over the world. Fedora benefits from having Ambassadors to attend these events to introduce Fedora and spread the word about the community. It’s not uncommon to see Fedora participating in these events, and Linux Weekend 2017 in Tirana, Albania was not an exception.

Jona Azizaj, Fedora Ambassador and Open Labs board member, kicks off Linux Weekend 2017

Jona Azizaj, Fedora Ambassador and Open Labs board member, kicks off Linux Weekend 2017

From March 25-26, 2017 in Tirana, Albania, nearly 130 people attended the first-ever Linux Weekend 2017. Linux Weekend was organized by Open Labs Hackerspace at the Universiteti Politeknik i Tiranës as an introduction to Linux for beginners. Throughout Tirana, universities have a strong focus on Windows or macOS operating systems and little focus is given to Linux. Open Labs community members wanted to organize an event that would promote Linux as an open source alternative and demonstrate some of its benefits over proprietary environments. The event collected representatives from various communities, including Fedora, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE, NextCloud, MusicBrainz, and more.

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First-ever overnight hackathon in Albania for sustainable goals

This article was originally published on Opensource.com.


Redon Skikuli addresses all attendees in Open Labs to kick off the hackathon

Redon Skikuli addresses all attendees in Open Labs to kick off the hackathon. © Eduard Pagria, used with permission

The local hackerspace in Tirana, Albania might be small, but they make up for size in spirit. During the weekend of 18-19 March 2017, the Open Labs Hackerspace organized the first-ever 48 hour “open source” hackathon focused on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The UN Sustainable Development Goals are seventeen objectives identified by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to build a better world, starting in our own communities. Some of the goals include quality education, gender equality, decent work and economic growth, clean energy, and more. During the course of the hackathon, participants selected a goal, broke into teams, and worked on projects to make real change in their own neighborhoods. In the spirit of open source, all projects are made available under free and open licenses.

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2016 – My Year in Review

Before looking too far ahead to the future, it’s important to spend time to reflect over the past year’s events, identify successes and failures, and devise ways to improve. Describing my 2016 is a challenge for me to find the right words for. This post continues a habit I started last year with my 2015 Year in Review. One thing I discover nearly every day is that I’m always learning new things from various people and circumstances. Even though 2017 is already getting started, I want to reflect back on some of these experiences and opportunities of the past year.

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Hatchit puts open source power in developers’ hands

This post was originally published on OpenSource.com.


More and more students are learning about the world of open source through video games. Games like FreeCiv let players build empires based on the history of human civilization while games like Minetest emulates Minecraft in an open source block-building sandbox. Students are encouraged to dig deeper into games like this, and projects like SpigotMC empower kids to write plugins to extend their favorite games. However, the tools in open source to build the actual games do not share the same prominence. Rochester Institute of Technology student Matt Guerrette hopes to help change that with his open source gaming engine, Hatchit.

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