CategoryFedora

This category is about the popular Linux distribution, Fedora. Fedora is a free and open source Linux distribution. It focuses on its four foundations of Freedom, Friends, Features, First. Some of the articles here are useful for users, many are aimed for other contributors.

Fedora is a free and open-source Linux distribution.

GSoC 2016: Moving towards staging

This week wraps up for July and the last period of Google Summer of Code (GSoC 2016) is almost here. As the summer comes to a close, I’m working on the last steps for preparing my project for deployment into Fedora’s Ansible infrastructure. Once it checks out in a staging instance, it can make the move to production.

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GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Documentation and upgrades

This week and the last were busy, but I’ve made some more progress towards creating the last, idempotent product for managing WordPress installations in Fedora’s Infrastructure for GSoC 2016. The past two weeks had me mostly working on writing the standard operating procedure / documentation for my final product as well as diving more into handling upgrades with WordPress. My primary playbook for installing WordPress is mostly complete, pending one last annoyance.

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Cześć, Poland! Back to Europe

Earlier this month, I received some of the most exciting news I have had all year. After much finger-crossing and (hopefully) hard work, I am traveling to Kraków, Poland, for the Fedora Project‘s annual Flock conference. Flock is described by the organizers as the following.

Flock, now in its fourth year, is a conference for Fedora contributors to come together, discuss new ideas, work to make those ideas a reality, and continue to promote the core values of the Fedora community: Freedom, Friends, Features, and First.

This year, I am attending as a contributor to the project, giving a talk, and leading a workshop!

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How to push Fedora Badges

Ever wondered what goes on behind the magic of Fedora Badges? How does a badge go from being a design to an earn-able entity? This short but handy guide breaks down the entire process for you. This post is adapted from a series of notes I took while watching Ralph Bean demo the procedure at PyCon. This guide is a supplement, not a replacement, for the official Badges SOP.

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GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Breaking down WordPress networks

This week, with an initial playbook for creating a WordPress installation created (albeit needing polish), my next focus was to look at the idea of creating a WordPress multi-site network. Creating a multi-site network would offer the benefits of only having to keep up a single base installation, with new sites extending from the same core of WordPress. Before making further refinements to the playbook, I wanted to investigate whether a WordPress network would be the best fit for Fedora.

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Fedora Ambassadors: Communicating about Design

This week is busy and continues to keep the pace of previous weeks. A lot has happened this week in the Fedora Project and I’ve taken on a few new tasks too. In addition to existing work on Google Summer of Code, Community Operations, Marketing, and more, I wanted to take some time this week to focus on CommOps Ticket #71. This ticket originally focused on improving accessibility of design resources for Fedora Ambassadors. However, after an interesting conversation with Máirín Duffy on the Design Team workflow, I discovered the availability was not the main issue. Instead, it seemed like communicating was an area needing focus.

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GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Assembling the orchestra

This week is the Google Summer of Code 2016 midterm evaluation week. Over the past month since the program started, I’ve learned more about the technology I’m working with, implementing it within my infrastructure, and moving closer to completing my proposal. My original project proposal details how I am working with Ansible to bring improved automation for WordPress platforms within Fedora, particularly to the Fedora Community Blog and the Fedora Magazine.

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Setting up Vagrant for testing Ansible

As part of my Google Summer of Code project proposal for the Fedora Project, I’ve spent a lot of time learning about the ins and outs of Ansible. Ansible is a handy task and configuration automation utility. In the Fedora Project, Ansible is used extensively in Fedora’s infrastructure. But if you’re first starting to learn Ansible, it might be tricky to test and play with it if you don’t have production or development servers you can use. This is where Vagrant comes in.

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Google Summer of Code, Fedora Class of 2016

This summer, I’m excited to say I will be trying on a new pair of socks for size.

Bad puns aside, I am actually enormously excited to announce that I am participating in this year’s Google Summer of Code program for the Fedora Project. If you are unfamiliar with Google Summer of Code (or often shortened to GSoC), Google describes it as the following.

Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development. Students work with an open source organization on a 3 month programming project during their break from school.

I will work with the Fedora Project over the summer on the CommOps slot. As part of my proposal, I will assist with migrating key points of communication in Fedora, like the Fedora Magazine and Community Blog, to Ansible-based installations. I have a few more things planned up my sleeve too.

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Going to Bitcamp 2016

Over the weekend of April 9th – 10th, the Fedora Project Ambassadors of North America attended the Bitcamp 2016 hackathon at the University of Maryland. But what is Bitcamp? The organizers describe it as the following.

Bitcamp is a place for exploration. You will have 36 hours to delve into your curiosities, learn something new, and make something awesome. With world-class mentors and hundreds of fellow campers, you’re in for an amazing time. If you’re ready for an adventure, see you by the fire!

The Fedora Project attended as an event sponsor this year. At the event, we held a table in the hacker arena. The Ambassadors offered mentorship and help to Bitcamp 2016 programmers, gave away some free Fedora swag, and offered an introduction to Linux, open source, and our community. This report recollects some highlights from the event.

Bitcamp 2016: The Fedora Ambassadors of Bitcamp 2016

The Fedora Ambassadors at Bitcamp 2016. Left to right: Chaoyi Zha (cydrobolt), Justin W. Flory (jflory7), Mike DePaulo (mikedep333), Corey Sheldon (linuxmodder)

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